105 World’s Most Amazing And Famous Waterfalls – 81 to 105

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After reviewing about 400 of waterfalls around the world i stopped at these beautiful and amazing 105 waterfalls. These I find most interesting. For me they are the tallest, biggest, largest most beautiful falls in the world. A waterfall is a place where flowing water rapidly drops in elevation as it flows over a steep region or a cliff. Enough said. I will let you now enjoy some beautiful natural wonders of our planet.

Please note that this post in not supposed to be complete so please be free to post links to other amazing waterfalls you’ve seen in the comments to this post.

The information sources are listed at the end of this post.

1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 105

Shoshone Falls, Idaho

Shoshone Falls, Idaho

Shoshone Falls is a waterfall on the Snake River located approximately five miles east of Twin Falls, Idaho, United States. Sometimes called the “Niagara of the West”, Shoshone Falls is 212 feet (64.7 m) high—45 feet (14 m) higher than Niagara Falls—and flows over a rim 1,000 feet (305 m) wide. photo source

Seven Sisters Waterfall, Norway

Seven Sisters Waterfall, Norway

The Seven Sisters (Norwegian: De Syv Søstrene or Dei Sju Systrene, also known as Knivsflåfossen) is the 39th tallest waterfall in Norway. The waterfall consists of seven separate streams, and it is located along the Geirangerfjord in the municipality of Stranda in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The waterfall is located just south of the historic Knivsflå farm, across the fjord from the old Skageflå farm. The falls are about 6.5 kilometres (4.0 mi) west of the village of Geiranger. The tallest of the seven has a free fall that measures 250 metres (820 ft). The legend of the seven sisters is that they dance playfully down the mountain, while a single waterfall opposite the seven sisters (known as the Courter, or Suitor) flirts playfully from across the fjord. In Norwegian, ‘The Suitor’ is Friaren. photo source

Skogafoss, Skoga River Waterfalls, Iceland

Skogafoss, Skoga River Waterfalls, Iceland

There are more than two dozen waterfalls along the Skoga River in Iceland, some over 30 meters tall. Very few of the waterfalls along this river, with the exception of one or two, have names, but they don’t need names to make their presence known. Skogafoss is located in the south of Iceland where the Skoga River tumbles over former sea cliffs. Skógafoss is some 82 feet wide and has a drop of some 197 feet. photo source

Snoqualmie Falls, Washington

Snoqualmie Falls, Washington

Snoqualmie Falls is a 268 ft (82 m) waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Snoqualmie and Fall City, Washington, USA. It is one of Washington’s most popular scenic attractions, but is perhaps best known internationally for its appearance in the cult television series Twin Peaks. More than 1.5 million visitors come to the Falls every year, where there is a two acre (8,000 m²) park, an observation deck, and a gift shop. photo source

The Staubbach Falls, Switzerland

The Staubbach Falls, Switzerland

The Staubbach Falls (German: Staubbachfall) is a waterfall in Switzerland, located just above Lauterbrunnen in the Bernese Oberland. The waterfall drops about 300 meters (1000 ft) from a hanging valley that ends in overhanging cliffs above the Lütschine River. photo source

Steinsdalsfossen, Norway

Steinsdalsfossen, Norway

Steinsdalsfossen (also called Øvsthusfossen or Øfsthusfossen) is a waterfall 2 kilometers west of Norheimsund, Hardanger in western Norway. The waterfall is one of the most visited in Norway. A path goes behind it where visitors can walk dryshod “into” the rumbling water. Steinsdalsfossen is about 50 meters high and is greatest when the snow melts in May and June. photo source

Sulphide Creek Falls, Washington

Sulphide Creek Falls, Washington

Sulphide Creek Falls is a tall, moderately large volume waterfall within North Cascades National Park in Washington. The falls drop from Sulphide Lake on the southeast side of Mount Shuksan down a narrow flume-like canyon to a broad basin below. Because of the narrow, twisting shape of the canyon the waterfall is exceptionally difficult to see from ground-level perspectives. The total vertical drop of the waterfall is in the range of 2,100 feet (640 m) to 2,200 feet (670 m) feet, but it has not yet been accurately measured. photo source

Sutherland Falls, New Zealand

Sutherland Falls, New Zealand

Sutherland Falls is a waterfall near Milford Sound in New Zealand’s South Island. At 580 metres (1,904 feet) the falls were long believed to be the tallest waterfall in New Zealand. However, Browne Falls cascades 843 metres (2,766 feet) down a mountainside in Doubtful Sound, leading some to view that as the tallest. photo source

Takakkaw Falls, British Columbia Canada

Takakkaw Falls, British Columbia Canada

Takakkaw Falls is a waterfall located in Yoho National Park, near Field, British Columbia, in Canada. Its highest point is 384m (1260 ft) from its base, making it the second-highest officially measured waterfall in western Canada, after Della Falls on Vancouver Island. However its true “free-fall” is only 254m (833 ft). “Takakkaw”, loosely translated from Cree, means something like “it is magnificent”. The falls are fed by the Daly Glacier which is part of the Waputik Icefield. The glacier keeps the volume of the falls up during the warm summer months, and are a tourist attraction, particularly in late spring after the heavy snow melts, when the falls are at peak condition. photo source

The Tequendama Falls, Colombia

The Tequendama Falls, Colombia

The Tequendama Falls (Spanish: Salto del Tequendama) is a 132m high waterfall on the Bogotá River, located about 30 km southwest of Bogotá in the municipality of San Antonio del Tequendama. The river surges through a rocky gorge that narrows to about 60 feet (18 m) at the brink of the 515feet (157meters) high falls. During the month of December the falls become completely dry. photo source

Triberg Falls Germany

Triberg Falls Germany

Triberg Falls is one of the highest waterfalls in Germany with a descent of 163 meters (at between 711 and 872 metres above sea level), and is a landmark in the Black Forest region. Above Triberg, in the midst of Black Forest, the Gutach river plunges over seven major steps from a gently undulated high plain into a rocky V-shaped valley. photo source

The Trummelbach Falls, Switzerland

The Trummelbach Falls, Switzerland

The Trummelbach Falls (In German: Trümmelbachfälle), located in Lauterbrunnen, District of Interlaken, Canton of Bern in Switzerland are a series of ten glacier-waterfalls inside the mountain made accessible by tunnel-lift and illuminated. Has a total height of 140 meters (459 feet). photo source

Tugela Falls, Republic of South Africa

Tugela Falls, Republic of South Africa

Tugela Falls is the world’s second highest waterfall. The total drop in five free-leaping falls is 948 meters (3,110 feet). They are located in the Drakensberg (Dragon’s Mountains) in the Royal Natal National Park in KwaZulu-Natal Province, Republic of South Africa. They are easily viewed after a heavy rain from the main travel road into the park, glistening from the reflection of the late afternoon sun. The source of the Tugela River (Zulu for ‘sudden’) is at Mont-Aux-Sources several kilometers from the escarpment from which the falls drop. The water is pure and safe to drink above the falls. photo source

The Umphang Thee Lor Sue Waterfall, Thailand

The Umphang Thee Lor Sue Waterfall, Thailand

The Umphang Thee Lor Sue Waterfall (also The Lor Sue, Thee Lor Sue or Te-law-zue) is claimed to be the largest and highest waterfall in Thailand. The waterfall is located in the Umphang Wildlife Sanctuary, is the most beautiful and biggest in Thailand. Original from Huai Klotho, it flows down a mountain valley at high of 200-300 metres and a width of almost 400-500 metres. The falls flow down in tiers surrounded by virgin forest. In the wet season, Tee Lor Sue waterfall will be at it most beautiful. photo source

Ventisquero Colgante, Cascada de (Hanging Glacier Falls), Chile

Ventisquero Colgante, Cascada de (Hanging Glacier Falls), Chile

Ventisquero Colgante Falls has a total height of 1600 feet 488 meters and it is located in Chile, Aisen, Queulat National Park, Puyuguapi. The falls are flowing out of the Ventisquero Colgante (Hanging Glacier) in Queulat National Park. A very large volume of water pours out from under the massive glacier and hurtles somewhere between 1400 and 2000 feet to the floor of the narrow valley. The falls often exhibit two segments, with a third, smaller segment falling even further than the main fall from a lobe of the glacier to the left of the main falls. Undoubtedly this is one of the best waterfalls in South America. photo source

Vernal Falls, California

Vernal Falls, California

Vernal Falls is a large waterfall on the Merced River just downstream of Nevada Fall in Yosemite National Park, California. While the official height of the waterfall is 317 feet (97 m), the United States Geographical Survey has measured it at approximately 240 feet (73 m). The waterfall runs all year long, although by the end of summer it is substantially reduced in volume and can split into multiple strands, rather than a single curtain of water. photo source

Vettisfossen, Norway

Vettisfossen, Norway

Vettisfossen is one of Norway’s tallest waterfalls. It is located in the Jotunheimen mountain range inside the Utladalen Landscape Protection Area in the municipality of Årdal in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The waterfall has a single drop of 275 metres (902 ft). photo source

The Victoria Falls, Zambia Zimbabwe

The Victoria Falls, Zambia Zimbabwe

The Victoria Falls or Mosi-oa-Tunya (the Smoke that Thunders) is a waterfall located in southern Africa on the Zambezi River between the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe. While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, it is claimed to be the largest. This claim is based on a width of 1,708 meters (5,604 ft) and height of 108 meters (354 ft), forming the largest sheet of falling water in the world. David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European recorded to view the Victoria Falls — which he did from what is now known as ‘Livingstone Island’ in Zambia, the only land accessible in the middle of the falls. David Livingstone gave the falls the name ‘Victoria Falls’ in honour of his Queen, but the indigenous name of ‘Mosi-oa-Tunya’ — literally meaning the ‘Smoke that Thunders’ — is also well known. The World Heritage List recognizes both names. photo source

Vinnufossen, Norway

Vinnufossen, Norway

Vinnufossen is the tallest waterfall in Europe and the sixth tallest in the world. The waterfall is located just east of the village of Sunndalsøra in the municipality of Sunndal in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The falls are part of the river Vinnu which flows down from the Vinnufjellet mountain and it is fed from the Vinnufonna glacier. The falls flow into the river Driva near the village of Hoelsand. It has a total height of 860 metres (2,820 ft), withe the height of longest drop 420 metres (1,380 ft). photo source

Virginia Falls, Canada

Virginia Falls, Canada

Virginia Falls (Slavey: Nailicho) is a waterfall in Nahanni National Park Reserve, Northwest Territories, Canada. It is located on the South Nahanni River, at an elevation of 500 m (1,600 ft).
It has a total drop of 96 m (315 ft), making it about twice the height of Niagara Falls. It consists of a single drop with an average width of 259 m (850 ft). The rock in the centre of the falls is called Mason’s Rock, named after Bill Mason, the famous Canadian canoeist, author, and filmmaker. photo source

Vøringsfossen Waterfall, Norway

Vøringsfossen Waterfall, Norway

Vøringsfossen in Måbødalen is one of Norway’s most famous waterfall, and has a fall of 182 metres, of which 145 metres is a direct drop. photo source

The Wallaman Falls, Australia

The Wallaman Falls, Australia

The Wallaman Falls are notable for their single-drop of 305 metres, which is Australia’s highest permanent waterfall. With the addition of additional related minor drops the overall height of the falls is approximately 340 metres. The pool at the end of the waterfall is 20 metres deep. The waterfall is formed by a tributary of the Herbert River, Stony Creek, which plunges over an escarpment in the Seaview Range. photo source

Wapama Falls, California

Wapama Falls, California

Wapama Falls is the larger of two waterfalls located on the northern wall of Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. Arguably the most powerful waterfall in Yosemite National Park, it flows almost year-round and during peak flow has been known to inundate the trail bridge crossing it, making the falls impossible to pass during peak flow. The falls consist of two primary drops angled roughly 60 degrees to each other, and a broad cascade at its base. Wapama Falls is fed by Lake Vernon, a few miles to the north. Total height 1,080 ft (330 m), Height of longest drop 300 ft (90 m), Number of drops 3. photo source

Wollomombi Falls, Australia

Wollomombi Falls, Australia

Wollomombi Falls (pronounced ‘walla mom bee’), from an Aboriginal word, are located in the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park, 40 km due east of Armidale, New South Wales and 1 km off the Waterfall Way. At one time they were believed to be the tallest in Australia. However, recent geographical revisions place them at second or third tallest, depending on the source, after Tin Mine Falls (New South Wales) and Wallaman Falls (near Ingham, Queensland). The Chandler Falls are located to the right of the Wollomombi Falls when viewed from the main lookout. After they join, these rivers are known as the Chandler River and become a tributary of the Macleay River. From the very top to the very bottom the height is approx 220 metres although its biggest drop where the water “falls” is only 100 m. photo source

Yosemite Falls, Yosemite Upper Falls, Yosemite Lower Falls, California

Yosemite Falls, California

Yosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America. Located in Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada of California, it is a major attraction in the park, especially in late spring when the water flow is at its peak. The total 2,425 feet (739 m) from the top of the upper falls to the base of the lower falls qualifies Yosemite Falls as the sixth highest waterfall in the world, though with the recent discovery of Gocta Cataracts, it appears on some lists as seventh.
The falls actually consist of three sections: Upper Falls: The 1,430-foot (440 m) plunge alone is among the twenty highest waterfalls in the world. Trails from the valley floor and down from other park areas outside the valley lead to both the top and base of Upper Yosemite Falls. The upper fall is formed by the swift waters of Yosemite Creek, which, after meandering through Eagle Creek Meadow, hurl themselves over the edge of a hanging valley in a spectacular and deafening show of force. Middle Cascades: Between the two obvious main plunges there are a series of five smaller plunges collectively referred to as the Middle Cascades. Taken together these account for a total drop of 675 feet (206 m), more than twice the height of the Lower Falls. Because of the narrow, constricted shape of the gorge in which these drops occur and the lack of public access, they are rarely noted. Most viewpoints in the valley miss them entirely. Several vantage points for the cascades are found along the Yosemite Falls trail. Several hikers climbing down from the trail towards the cascades have required an expensive helicopter rescue due to steep and slippery terrain and features. Lower Falls: The final 320-foot (98 m) drop adjacent to an accessible viewing area, provides the most-used viewing point for the waterfalls. Yosemite Creek emerges from the base of the Lower Falls and flows into the Merced River nearby. Like many areas of Yosemite the plunge pool at the base of the Lower Falls is surrounded by dangerous jumbles of talus made even more treacherous by the high humidity and resulting slippery surfaces. photo source

Inspiration sources: en.wikipedia.org, www.world-waterfalls.com, www.world-of-waterfalls.com


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